Mercedes Maintenance Cost: How Much Will You Pay?

Mercedes Maintenance Cost How Much Will You Pay

One of the most important things that you should consider before buying a luxury vehicle like a Mercedes is the cost to maintain it all year round.

Thus, we’ll be discussing all that you need to know about the maintenance cost of a Mercedes-Benz in this article.

For starters, we have the average annual maintenance cost of a Mercedes-Benz as well as how it compares to those of other luxury brands below.

How much does maintenance on a Mercedes-Benz cost?

The average maintenance cost for a Mercedes-Benz is $908 per year, which is $256 more expensive than the industry standard average of $652. 

However, this cost is still comparable to those of other luxury brands such as Audi, BMW, and Lincoln.

Vehicle BrandAverage Maintenance Cost Per AnnumPrice Delta vs Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz$9080
Audi$987+$79 (+9%)
BMW$968+$60 (+7%)
Infiniti$638-$270 (-30%)
Lexus$551-$357 (-39%)
Lincoln$879-$29 (-3%)
Porsche$1,192+$284 (+31%)
Luxury Brands’ Average$1,200+$292 (+32%)
Industry Standard Average (Non-Luxury)$652-$256 (-28%)

Mercedes-Benz vs Audi Maintenance Cost

Mercedes-Benz vs Audi Maintenance Cost

The average maintenance cost for an Audi is $987 per year, which is $79 (9%) more expensive than the average maintenance cost for a Mercedes-Benz at $908 per year.

Mercedes-Benz vs BMW Maintenance Cost

Mercedes-Benz vs BMW Maintenance Cost

The average maintenance cost for a BMW is $968 per year, which is $60 (7%) more expensive than the average maintenance cost for a Mercedes-Benz at $908 per year.

Mercedes-Benz vs Infiniti Maintenance Cost

Mercedes-Benz vs Infiniti Maintenance Cost

The average maintenance cost for an Infiniti is $638 per year, which is $270 (30%) cheaper than the average maintenance cost for a Mercedes-Benz at $908 per year.

Mercedes-Benz vs Lexus Maintenance Cost

Mercedes-Benz vs Lexus Maintenance Cost

The average maintenance cost for a Lexus is $551 per year, which is $357 (39%) cheaper than the average maintenance cost for a Mercedes-Benz at $908 per year.

Mercedes-Benz vs Lincoln Maintenance Cost

Mercedes-Benz vs Lincoln Maintenance Cost

The average maintenance cost for a Lincoln is $879 per year, which is $29 (3%) cheaper than the average maintenance cost for a Mercedes-Benz at $908 per year.

Mercedes-Benz vs Porsche Maintenance Cost

Mercedes-Benz vs Porsche Maintenance Cost

The average maintenance cost for a Porsche is $1,192 per year, which is $284 (31%) more expensive than the average maintenance cost for a Mercedes-Benz at $908 per year.

How often does a Mercedes-Benz need maintenance?

Maintenance intervals for a Mercedes-Benz vehicle will depend on the type of maintenance service performed. Minor maintenance services such as oil changes and tire rotations should be done every 10,000 miles (16,000 km).

Maintenance IntervalType of Maintenance ServiceAverage Cost
Every 10,000 miles (16,000 km)• Oil change

• Oil filter change

• Safety check

• Tire rotation

$448 to $510
Every 20,000 miles (32,000 km)• Oil change

• Oil filter change

• Visual inspection of hoses, belts, and brakes

• Possible brake pad replacement

• Tire rotation

• Fluid leak inspection

• Safety check

$727 to $861
Every 30,000 miles (48,000 km)• Brake pad replacement

• Brake fluid change

• Transmission fluid change

• Engine coolant change

• Possible engine air filter replacement

• Possible spark plug replacement

• Possible fuel filter replacement

$452 to $515
Every 40,000 miles (Every 64,000 km)• Possible drive belt replacement

• Possible motor mount replacement

• Possible suspension bushing replacement

$928 to $1,086
Every 60,000 miles (96,000 km)• Automatic transmission fluid (ATF) change

• Differential fluid change

• Engine coolant change

• Spark plug replacement

• Fuel filter replacement

• Possible timing belt replacement

$1,322 to $1,537

Oil Change

Oil Change

Oil changes for a Mercedes-Benz vehicle should be done every 10,000 miles (16,000 km), which will cost you an average of $143 to $207.

Furthermore, it’s highly recommended that you use synthetic oil instead of conventional oil for a Mercedes-Benz, as the former is a lot more refined and allows you to reach the 10,000-mile interval more easily.

When using full synthetic engine oil for a Mercedes, you can expect to spend an average of $60 to $120 depending on the brand and how much your specific Mercedes model needs.

Filters

There are several different types of filters on a Mercedes-Benz that should be replaced as part of its overall maintenance.

Fuel Filter

Fuel Filter

The fuel filter on a Mercedes-Benz lasts between 30,000 to 60,000 miles (48,000 to 96,000 km), so if you’re anywhere within this mileage range, then you should consider getting your fuel filter replaced.

As for the cost to replace a fuel filter on a Mercedes, you’re looking to spend between $253 and $313 depending on the exact Mercedes model.

This amount is over twice as expensive as the average fuel filter cost of $80 to $150.

Engine Air Filter and Cabin Air Filter

Engine Air Filter and Cabin Air Filter

There are two types of air filters on a Mercedes that need to be replaced at regular intervals, and these are the engine air filter and the cabin air filter.

Engine air filter replacement intervals may vary depending on the Mercedes model, but the average is every 30,000 to 45,000 miles. You can also expect to pay between $97 and $187 for them.

When replacing cabin air filters, however, they should be done every 12,000 to 15,000 miles, according to general recommendations by manufacturers. Doing so will cost you between $95 and $161 per change.

The engine air filter is located within the vehicle’s engine bay, and its main task is to keep dirt, dust, or any foreign contaminants from getting sucked into the engine.

The cabin air filter’s job is very similar to that of an engine air filter, except that it’s located in the interior (cabin) of the vehicle. Its job is to filter out any foreign particle that passes through the air conditioning, heating, and ventilation system.

Brake Pads

Brake Pads

To ensure that your Mercedes-Benz brakes have enough stopping power, you should change its brake pads every 30,000 to 70,000 miles (48,000 to 112,000 km), though this can be as early as 20,000 miles depending on your driving style.

A set of brake pads for a Mercedes will cost you $177 to $366 per axle depending on the model, which is just a little bit more expensive compared to the industry average of $150 to $300 per axle.

Specifically, brake pad replacement for Mercedes SUVs such as the GLE350 and GLA250 tend to cost upwards of $200 per axle. Even the Mercedes S550 luxury sedan follows suit at $287 per axle.

Additionally, a Mercedes-Benz vehicle needs its brake fluid changed every 30,000 miles (48,000 km), which will cost you about $90 to $200.

Most new Mercedes-Benz vehicles today require DOT 4+ brake fluid specifically.

Spark Plugs

Spark Plugs

Spark plugs on a Mercedes-Benz need to be replaced either every 30,000 miles (48,000 km) or once every 2 to 3 years, whichever comes first.

Getting spark plugs replaced on a Mercedes will cost you between $220 and $519, depending on the kind of spark plug and the vehicle model itself.

This price range is over twice the industry standard average cost of $75 to $250 for replacing a vehicle’s spark plugs.

Mercedes-Benz vehicles commonly use either platinum or iridium spark plugs, and brands such as NGK and Bosch make great examples of these.

Be sure to check your owner’s manual to find out which set of spark plugs is recommended for your specific Mercedes-Benz model.

Transmission Fluid

Transmission Fluid

The interval for changing the transmission fluid of a Mercedes-Benz will depend on the type of transmission it has.

Mercedes vehicles with manual transmissions should get their fluids checked and possibly replaced at 30,000 miles (48,000 km).

On the other hand, Mercedes vehicles with automatic transmissions can have their ATF fluids changed less frequently every 60,000 miles (96,000 km).

On average, a manual or automatic transmission fluid change for a Mercedes-Benz will cost you $100. However, this may vary depending on the shop and the exact vehicle model.

Tire Rotations and Tire Change

Tire Rotations and Tire Change

A typical tire rotation for a Mercedes-Benz is performed every 5,000 to 7,500 miles (8,000 to 12,000 km), but this can be as much as 10,000 miles (16,000 km) if you do not drive that often. 

You can expect to pay an average of $50 for a tire rotation on a Mercedes.

Tire rotations ensure that your Mercedes-Benz tires wear out evenly before they eventually need to be replaced. 

Tire changes for a Mercedes, on the other hand, are a lot more expensive at an average price range of $200 to $300 per tire.

You can expect Mercedes-Benz tires to last you for 50,000 miles (80,000 km), but the manufacturer also recommends changing the tires once you cross the 6-year mark, regardless of their mileage. 

Battery

Battery

The battery on a Mercedes-Benz will last you for 4 to 5 years. You can expect to spend an average of $328 to $576 to replace a Mercedes-Benz battery, which is more expensive than the industry standard cost of $120 to $240.

This is because Mercedes vehicles use premium batteries, which are frequently of the AGM (absorbent glass mat) variant. This, combined with the typical high labor costs associated with Mercedes, further increases the price to replace a battery.

Just in case you’re not entirely sure how old your Mercedes battery is, there are some tell-tale signs that you can watch out for that may indicate it’s going bad.

  • It takes longer for the engine to start or doesn’t start at all.
  • You experience random fluctuations in power.
  • Headlights are getting dimmer.
  • Interior electronics are getting weaker.
  • You need to jump-start the car more often.

Timing Belt/Chain

Timing BeltChain

One of the more expensive things to replace on a Mercedes-Benz is the timing belt or timing chain, which costs around $500 to $1,000 (including parts and labor).

But the good news is that you only need to replace it every 80,000 to 120,000 miles (130,000 to 190,000 km), with the earliest possible interval being 60,000 miles (96,000 km).

Furthermore, the average cost for a Mercedes timing chain replacement mentioned above is about the same as the industry standard average as well.

While the majority of Mercedes-Benz vehicles use a timing chain instead of a timing belt, we’ve still provided you with the difference between the two for your reference below.

Timing chains are made out of metal, while timing belts are made out of rubber instead. This makes timing chains more durable and last longer compared to timing belts.

However, the upside to using timing belts is that they are cheaper to manufacture and run quieter inside the engine bay compared to timing chains.

Headlight Bulbs

Headlight Bulbs

When it comes to replacing the headlight bulbs on a Mercedes-Benz, both the expected lifespan and the cost to replace the bulbs vary greatly depending on the type of bulb, the specific Mercedes model, and even the location of the shop.

Assuming you use them for 2 hours per day, cheaper halogen headlight bulbs have a lifespan of 2 to 3 years, whereas LED ones can last for 3 to 5 years.

The price range for replacing Mercedes-Benz headlight bulbs can cost between $60 and $373, which is quite a large range to work with.

For instance, a Mercedes S-class, such as the S550, has headlight bulbs that cost $240 to $373 to replace. This makes it one of the most expensive Mercedes models to have its headlight bulbs replaced.

In comparison, an older Mercedes E350 from 2007 to 2011 has headlight bulbs that only cost an average of $89 to replace, according to Repairsmith.com.

Are Mercedes vehicles more expensive than other brands?

Mercedes-Benz is more expensive than other car brands as it’s a luxury car brand that uses premium parts and features not usually found in the average vehicle. 

Out of 24 car brands listed by Repairpal, Mercedes-Benz is the second most expensive in terms of average annual maintenance cost at $908.

BrandAverage Maintenance Cost Per Annum
BMW$968
Mercedes-Benz$908
Lincoln$879
RAM$858
Cadillac$783
Ford$775
Volvo$769
GMC$744
Volkswagen$676
Chevrolet$649
Infiniti$638
Jeep$634
Dodge$634
Subaru$617
Chrysler$608
Buick$608
Mitsubishi$535
Acura$501
Nissan$500
Kia$474
Hyundai$468
Mazda$462
Toyota$441
Honda$428

Common Mercedes-Benz Problems

Mercedes-Benz vehicles can commonly run into problems such as transmission problems, engine misfires, engine mount failures, differential leaks, rusting, and air suspension failures.

We have provided more descriptions of each of the above-mentioned common Mercedes problems below. 

Furthermore, if you would like even more info about the various problems that are common to all Mercedes models, we recommend checking out this video as well.

Transmission Problems

Transmission Problems

There are several different transmission-related problems that a Mercedes-Benz can run into.

The transmission wiring harness’s 13-pin connector is known to leak transmission fluid, which damages the control module in the process.

The transmission’s valve body is also known to become defective over time, which results in either poor gearshifting or not being able to shift at all.

Another common transmission-related problem is that you cannot get the vehicle out of the “Park” gear because of a faulty brake light switch.

Engine Misfires

Engine Misfires

While engine misfires can happen to any Mercedes-Benz model, it happens more frequently to Mercedes owners that do not follow the recommended maintenance for their vehicle.

Specifically, engine misfires have been reported to happen when the spark plugs and ignition coils are way past their recommended replacement interval, which is 60,000 miles (48,000 km) for the former and 100,000 miles (160,000 km) for the latter.

Whenever a Mercedes engine is misfiring, you will start to notice a decrease in performance and vibrations in the cabin.

Engine Mount Failure

Engine Mount Failure

Engine mount failures are a common occurrence across a lot of Mercedes-Benz models, and it involves the mounts leaking oil whenever you reach 100,000 miles on your vehicle.

When the Mercedes engine mounts fail, the most common symptom is a significant vibration around the cabin, the seat, and the steering wheel.

Differential Leaks

Differential Leaks

A leaking differential is another common problem that has been experienced by a lot of Mercedes-Benz owners over the years.

It has been reported to occur most frequently in high-mileage Mercedes E-class models, and the usual culprits are the differential covers, pinion seals, or axle seals deteriorating.

Rust Problems

Rust Problems

Mercedes-Benz vehicles, regardless if they are older or newer models, are notorious for being prone to rust more than the average car.

There are several rust-prone areas on a Mercedes that you should look out for, such as on the bumpers and front fenders, behind the license plate, along the floorboards, underneath the wheel wells, and underneath the driver and passenger seats.

Air Suspension Failure

Air Suspension Failure

Some Mercedes-Benz models featured “AIRMATIC” air suspension instead of standard struts and shocks, but these were sadly prone to failure.

Whenever the AIRMATIC bags failed, the most common signs were uneven ride height and tire wear.

The two Mercedes models that were affected by this issue the most were the E-Class W211 and S-Class W220, which were the first to be equipped with this type of air suspension system.